The science of anti-vaccination

Once their mind has been made up, confirmation bias sets in. Confirmation bias is simply our tendency to more readily, and with less scrutiny, accept information, anecdotes, and world views that confirm our existing beliefs. And, again, it is a completely normal thing that every person does. Indeed, trying to convince someone that a previously held belief is incorrect has been proven to actually increase their affinity for that idea. And so a community is born, and the safety of vaccines is called into question. And once the procedure for getting a vaccine goes from the doctor telling you that it is now time for a vaccine — and 99% of parents agreeing because that person went through medical school — to it being a question to ponder, vaccination rates will go down.

Via Kottke.org

The Florida Keys Babymoon

I am taking my wife on a Babymoon in April to the Florida Keys after finding an amazingly priced flight last night. I was up until almost 4 in the morning reading, booking a resort, and seeing what we can get into down there. I love to travel. I also really love to read guidebooks about where we’re going. I use them to choose things to do while we’re there, find neat little places to eat, and find hidden beaches, authentic experiences, and off-the-beaten-path places.

So, I added a few books to Calibre and pushed them to my Voyage to read over the next weeks including:

I’m on a quest to read 50 books in 2015.

8, 9, 10, 11 & 12 / 50 – Key West Travel Books

Jana Romanova’s “Waiting”

Via Slate. Jana Romanova photographed 40 couples, one for each week of pregnancy, over a two year span in Russia for her series “Waiting.”

Romanova-Waiting

She started her series by photographing her friends sleeping early in the morning in their bedrooms—a time, as she wrote on her website, “when people don’t really care about their appearance and one can see their attitude to each other and to this life that is growing inside their family.”